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Do's and don'ts for your job search

10/21/2020

Do's and don'ts for your job search

A job search can be a long and complicated process, and as such, job seekers need to do all they can to keep things simple and straightforward throughout. That's easier said than done, obviously, but there are things you can do to make sure you have as much success as possible in this effort.

The following dos and don'ts should help you do a better job of connecting with potential employers and otherwise ensure you have a better time from the start of your job search all the way through to the end.

Do: Think before you search

Before you do anything else, it's important to figure out what your strategy is going to be, according to Live Career. There are many different ways to go about a job search, and you should try to find a path forward that you're comfortable with. That is, you have to determine whether to tap your network first or as a last resort, how much time you plan to spend on your search each week and so on.

Don't: Be single-minded

It won't serve you well to only pick one aspect of the job search and mine that to its absolute core before moving on to a new strategy, Live Career noted. That's true not only because it may cause you to miss other opportunities, but also because it can lead to burnout, which you absolutely do not want.

Do: Identify the best places to look

There are all sorts of job boards and other sources for potential leads, but if you're not aware of them, those are even more opportunities that might be evading your grasp, according to The Job Network. For that reason, a little research on options for your specific industry or field of focus could uncover options that help expedite your entire search.

Don't: Overthink cover letters and resumes

In many cases, you may feel you need to do more to stand out from a potentially huge group of applicants, and that may encourage you to change your resume and cover letter to be more "eye-catching," The Job Network noted. However, this isn't a good idea, because hiring managers are just as likely to see funky colors or uncommon fonts as a strike against you, rather than something positive.

Do: Build your online presence

Just as you will research your potential employers, it's important to make sure they can do the same for yours — and that means controlling the message, according to Cleverism. If you don't have a personal website to promote your professional efforts, now is the time to build one. You should also make sure your social media accounts are fully updated and scrubbed of anything a potential employer might find objectionable.

Don't: Stop your search if you have a promising lead

A classic mistake many job seekers make is feeling like they have an opportunity in the bag after they hear back about scheduling an interview or even go on one, Cleverism cautioned. You never know how good your competition is, and you should always keep multiple lines in the water, even if you feel like you have something hooked.